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If you would like to stay up to date with the Foundation’s work, please subscribe to our mailing list below.

Donate

The Foundation depends on donations to continue and develop it’s activities. Donations of any size are most welcome.

Donations can also be made by direct transfer to our bank. In this case, please send payments to:
The Foundation for the History of Totalitarianism
Sort code: 23-05-80
Account number: 39562898

About

The Foundation for the History of Totalitarianism is a non-profit organisation established to provide information and education about the history of totalitarianism, particularly in the 20th century. It aims to encourage study and research in a variety of ways including the creation of an annual history essay prize on a different subject each year. The winning entries will be published on the website.

It also aims to publish papers by scholars on various aspects of the history of totalitarianism.

Trustees:
Professor Aleksander Szczerbiak
Professor Hugo de Burgh
Dr Natalia Murray
Peter Rendek
James Bartholomew
Roger Moorhouse

Company number: 12674667
Registered Charity Number:  1192517

Registered Office Address:
30 Finsbury Circus,
London EC2M 7DT

Email us at:  contact@historyoftotalitarianism.com

The History of Totalitarianism Essay Prize

Entries are invited for the 2021-2022 sixth form history essay prize.

The subject this year is:

The Stasi

The Stasi – or State Security Service – had over 90,000 employees at its peak and between 500,000 and 2,000,000 informers. It was perhaps the biggest political surveillance organisation in relation to the size of population that has ever existed.


Still from the film, “the lives of others”  featuring the Stasi.

How did the Stasi operate? What was its impact on the lives of East Germans? What does the Stasi tell us about the government which created it? 

Essays should be 1,800 to 2,000 words. 

First prize: £1,500.
Second prize: £600.
Third prize: £300.

Each prize will be divided equally between the student and the school. 

Three to five entries will be highly commended and students will receive £50 each.  

The essay prize would suit students who want to improve their personal statements in their UCAS forms. The prize is open to students who will be in year 12 or year 13 in the academic year 2021-22. They must be resident in the United Kingdom. 

The deadline for entries is 12 noon on January 23rd, 2022. 

The prizes will be awarded in a prestigious central London location. 

Please register your interest in taking part by clicking the button below. 

Please watch out for our welcome email which will have more details about the kind of essay we are looking for. We will also send subsequent updates which might also be helpful.

There will be an online submissions form on this website by the end of August 2021.

Any queries should be emailed to contact@historyoftotalitarianism.com.

The small print: Source references are not required but are encouraged when referring to facts that are disputed or little-known. Candidates will be required to sign a statement of originality stating that the essay is their own work. The essay must not previously have been published in any language. Each candidate must only submit one entry but there is no limit to the number of entries from any school. There is no fee to enter. Entries delivered after the deadline will not be considered. Further terms and conditions can be viewed here.

School history essay prize 2020-21

Book Extract

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Artefacts Acquired

Original photograph of inmates of Vaihingen an der Enz concentration camp (officially named Wiesengrund) looking out through the barbed wire fence of their prison. Originally built as a slave labour camp, in 1944 Vaihingen would become a concentration camp for sick and dying prisoners.
A letter from Hactan Blasiak to his wife Julia, dated May 16, 1941. Hactan Blasiak, prisoner’s number 28070, was an inmate of Sachsenhausen concentration camp. The letter is brief, and mentions nothing about life in the camp: the camp censors were extraordinarily strict. He sends his wife kisses and hugs, and assures her that he will write to her as often as he is permitted. Prisoners at Sachsenhausen were killed openly, exploited for labour, and subjected to medical experiments. Of the 200,000 inmates held in the camp between 1936-45, 30,000 died: either from starvation, overwork, or execution.

Speakers at Schools and Universities

The Foundation is sometimes able to provide a speaker for schools and universities on a limited basis in London and nearby areas. Please email: contact@historyoftotalitarianism.com 
for further information.

The History of Totalitarianism Essay Prize

Entries are invited for the 2021-2022 sixth form history essay prize.

The subject this year is:

The Stasi

The Stasi – or State Security Service – had over 90,000 employees at its peak and between 500,000 and 2,000,000 informers. It was perhaps the biggest political surveillance organisation in relation to the size of population that has ever existed.


Still from the film, “the lives of others”  featuring the Stasi.

How did the Stasi operate? What was its impact on the lives of East Germans? What does the Stasi tell us about the government which created it? 

Essays should be 1,800 to 2,000 words. 

First prize: £1,500.
Second prize: £600.
Third prize: £300.

Each prize will be divided equally between the student and the school. 

Three to five entries will be highly commended and students will receive £50 each.  

The essay prize would suit students who want to improve their personal statements in their UCAS forms. The prize is open to students who will be in year 12 or year 13 in the academic year 2021-22. They must be resident in the United Kingdom. 

The deadline for entries is 12 noon on January 23rd, 2022. 

The prizes will be awarded in a prestigious central London location. 

Please register your interest in taking part by clicking the button below. 

Please watch out for our welcome email which will have more details about the kind of essay we are looking for. We will also send subsequent updates which might also be helpful.

There will be an online submissions form on this website by the end of August 2021.

Any queries should be emailed to contact@historyoftotalitarianism.com.

The small print: Source references are not required but are encouraged when referring to facts that are disputed or little-known. Candidates will be required to sign a statement of originality stating that the essay is their own work. The essay must not previously have been published in any language. Each candidate must only submit one entry but there is no limit to the number of entries from any school. There is no fee to enter. Entries delivered after the deadline will not be considered. Further terms and conditions can be viewed here.

School history essay prize 2020-21

Subscribe

If you would like to stay up to date with the Foundation’s work, please subscribe to our mailing list below.

Donate

The Foundation depends on donations to continue and develop it’s activities. Donations of any size are most welcome.

Donations can also be made by direct transfer to our bank. In this case, please send payments to:
The Foundation for the History of Totalitarianism
Sort code: 23-05-80
Account number: 39562898

Book Extract

About

The Foundation for the History of Totalitarianism is a non-profit organisation established to provide information and education about the history of totalitarianism, particularly in the 20th century. It aims to encourage study and research in a variety of ways including the creation of an annual history essay prize on a different subject each year. The winning entries will be published on the website.

It also aims to publish papers by scholars on various aspects of the history of totalitarianism.

Trustees:
Professor Aleksander Szczerbiak
Professor Hugo de Burgh
Dr Natalia Murray
Peter Rendek
James Bartholomew
Roger Moorhouse

Company number: 12674667
Registered Charity Number:  1192517

Registered Office Address:
30 Finsbury Circus,
London EC2M 7DT

Email us at:  contact@historyoftotalitarianism.com

Follow on Facebook

Artefacts Acquired

Original photograph of inmates of Vaihingen an der Enz concentration camp (officially named Wiesengrund) looking out through the barbed wire fence of their prison. Originally built as a slave labour camp, in 1944 Vaihingen would become a concentration camp for sick and dying prisoners.
A letter from Hactan Blasiak to his wife Julia, dated May 16, 1941. Hactan Blasiak, prisoner’s number 28070, was an inmate of Sachsenhausen concentration camp. The letter is brief, and mentions nothing about life in the camp: the camp censors were extraordinarily strict. He sends his wife kisses and hugs, and assures her that he will write to her as often as he is permitted. Prisoners at Sachsenhausen were killed openly, exploited for labour, and subjected to medical experiments. Of the 200,000 inmates held in the camp between 1936-45, 30,000 died: either from starvation, overwork, or execution.

Speakers at Schools and Universities

The Foundation is sometimes able to provide a speaker for schools and universities on a limited basis in London and nearby areas. Please email: contact@historyoftotalitarianism.com 
for further information.

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